7/26/2019 (4:30 PM)  -  7/29/2019
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Clark Mountain is one of the highest peaks in the North-Central Cascades of Washington. It is roughly 50th highest in the state depending on the list you go by. Since it is the farthest south of all the northern Washington Top 100 peaks, there are no nearby high peaks to its south. As such, when you get to its top, it seems to tower over the lower hills to its south much like Mt. Rainier towers over its surroundings. At least that's the impression I got. Seven miles to the WNW of Clark is the stratovolcano Glacier Peak (10,541 ft), of which many a summitposter is familiar. Clark and Glacier are connected by a long high ridge. This ridge is known as the DaKobed Range. (DaKobed means "Great Parent" and was an indian name for Glacier Peak.) Other major peaks along this ridge include Luahna Peak (est. 8,450 ft), Chalangin Peak (est. 8,350 ft), Tenpeak Mountain (8,281 ft), and the Kololo Peaks (8,200+ ft).

Clark Mountain is characterized by rugged, open south and west sides and glaciated north and east flanks. The vertical drop from the summit to the White River on the southwest is an impressive 6,100 ft in about two miles. The drop to the northeast to Napeequa River is 4,100 feet in about two miles. There are two important glaciers eating away at Clark. The first of these is the Walrus Glacier (shown as the Clark Glacier on maps) on the east. It is about 3/10th of a square mile in area. When it is in shape, this glacier is a semi-popular basic glacier climb for the Mountaineers. The second but larger glacier is the Richardson (1.4 sq. mi.) on the northern flanks. The Richardson Glacier pinches in between Clark and Luahna and extends up to Clark on a second tier.

Attendance of mountaineering training is required. In addition, previous climbing experience, proficiency of ice axe use and general mountaineering skills will assessed for those attending. This climb is limited to a party of 12. We ask that adult sign up be limited to 4-5 to insure more Scouts can attend. Final 12 will be selected by sign up time and mountaineering skills ability.

This site is run by Troop 1539, Orca District, Chief Seattle Council, Boy Scouts of America
It is not an official BSA site